Group size matters

This 2014 op ed in the NY Times relates to the Social Role Valorization (SRV) theme of competency enhancement, in this case, as related to the role of student. It examines ways that group size (class size) can enhance student competencies and provide greater access to the good things of life, including access to higher […]

Posted on December 18, 2020 at 1:26 pm by MTumeinski · Permalink · Leave a comment
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From study to implementation: SRV and PASSING (tip #1)

Both the PASSING tool (manual) and the PASSING workshop are high quality resources that can help to make SRV theory concrete, practical and ‘implementable.’ For example, the PASSING tool (manual) includes 42 distinct ratings, and PASSING workshop teams typically study, review and assess each of these ratings one by one. This repeated study and practice […]

Posted on November 13, 2017 at 12:08 pm by MTumeinski · Permalink · Leave a comment
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SRV action implications

The SRV monograph includes a useful chart laying out categories of SRV action implications that can help us think about how to implement SRV, with an eye towards helping societally devalued people to have greater access to the ‘good things of life.’ The chart is on pages 103-105 in the 2014 edition of the SRV […]

Posted on October 31, 2015 at 5:18 pm by MTumeinski · Permalink · Leave a comment
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NY Times article: ‘Hand of a Superhero’

An article to read and discuss from an SRV perspective. What valued social roles might this open the door to, and thus increase the probability of greater access to the good things of life? (Note the reference to a role in the 4th paragraph, but what other roles are mentioned and/or could be envisioned?) Use […]

Posted on February 17, 2015 at 9:04 am by MTumeinski · Permalink · Leave a comment
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NY Times article: To Siri With Love: How One Boy With Autism Became BFF With Apple’s Siri

This recent article in the NY Times would make a good basis for a Social Role Valorization-based exercise or discussion, in an agency, study group or university class. It would require thinking about multiple elements–first individually, and then collectively. This is one of the strengths of SRV and PASSING: that it teaches people how to think […]

role theory on the ‘everyday sociology’ blog

I just read an entry on the ‘Everyday Sociology’ blog sponsored by Norton Publishing. The entry is about role theory, and touches on: expectations, social status and behaviors. I like the idea of trying to blog about this (and other) sociological concepts in a simple way that invites readers to think about a particular concept. […]

the wealth of concrete SRV implementation strategies

The principles of Social Role Valorization (SRV) contain a wealth of practical and highly concrete implementation strategies, both broad and deep, that can be carried out by individuals, groups or on the societal level. No helping approach, no social movement, no human service program will be able, either on its own or in combination, to […]

new article: ‘What would be better? Social Role Valorization and the development of ministry to persons affected by disability

With Dr. Jeff McNair from CalBaptist University, I recently co-wrote an article which was published in the inaugural issue of The Journal of the Christian Institute on Disability. Dr. McNair has attended SRV and is familiar with Dr. Wolfensberger’s work.   The article citation is The Journal of the Christian Institute on Disability, 1(1), 11-22 […]

‘Architecture of Insanity’

Jack Yates recently shared with me an article entitled the ‘Architecture of Insanity: Boston Government Service Center’ by Michelle Koh and Gwen Lee. Located in Massachusetts (US), the Government Service Center has two parts, one of which is the Erich Lindemann Mental Health Center. The photos and description of the Lindemann Center are particularly relevant to Social Role […]

SRV training: leadership development

Wolf Wolfensberger and the Training Institute which he founded in 1973 was committed to leadership development for the human service field. After his passing in 2011, the work of the Training Institute has continued to support this goal. The goal of fostering leadership development shaped the way that Wolfensberger (and many of his students) designed […]